"He's just an old rodeo bum"

by AMY WITT


Underneath that old felt cowboy hat, is a face who's experienced life chasing him like a hungry grizzly bear. Buried many shattered dreams and conquered several different battles, burying many different friends. Screaming from his dreams and howling with the wind.

 

He's ridden and driven many miles, each mile singing its own lonesome wild tale. His leather soles share the triumphs of many...and defeat from them all. He's sat with a medicine man and drifted to the depths of the devil's soul.

 

An old cow twister and a boot stompin' whistler who's sang his memories with his smoke and drifted among the Nigger Toe.

 

He's a sharped dressed cowboy with a witty rugged tongue.

 

He's laughed among the mocking birds and cried to the moon. He's danced under the stars and dreamt of ropin' the moon.

 

His presence, yes it's something else. Weathered skin and fine lines decorate his jagged handsome chin. His eyes as blue as an Oregon river and his smile like everyone's first win.

 

He's no stranger to adventure and never a fool to lust. He dreams of a cowgirl he loves who's chasing the wandering stars.

 

Seven world champions, he's more than just a cowboy.

 

"He's just an old rodeo bum," that's all they would say. "He sits in the sun smoking and dreaming his days away."

Photo courtesy: Pinterest - James Dean

Photo courtesy: Pinterest - James Dean


Confessions of a Cowgirl - Volume V

by AMY WITT


Photo courtesy: California Dreamin' 

Photo courtesy: California Dreamin' 

 

Jimmy was standing over me as I look around the hospital room.

“Jimmy, why am I here?” I ask.

A nurse standing in the corner interrupts, “Honey, you are way too young not to take care of yourself. You are dehydrated, famished and highly stressed. “

I look at the nurse and turn my head to Jimmy, “Jimmy, I need and want out of here…like now!”

“They’re getting your paperwork ready to release you and then we can go,” Jimmy replies.

“I’m sorry Jimmy…you know I don’t want to be here. You know how this place makes me feel.”

The discharge nurse comes in shortly after I wake and gives me my discharge papers.

“You can go home now sweetie. Please take care of yourself.”

“I will, thank you,” I nod at the nurse as another nurse brings in a wheel chair.

“I’m sorry,” I say “but I don’t need that wheel chair, I would prefer to walk.”

Jimmy helps me up and holds my arm as I get out of the bed and head down to the elevators.

“How are you doing Jimmy? How long have I been in there?” I ask.

“I am doing well, but I am even happier to see you doing better. You were only here for a few hours. You blacked out from being dehydrated, neglecting to eat, while inducing too much stress on your body.”

Damn it, I tell myself. I look down and say nothing.

“Yote’s in the truck waiting for you. He’s been worried sick about you,” Jimmy says.

As we approach the ranch truck, I can see the tips of Yote’s ears through the passenger window.

I open the door as Yote licks my hand while I get in.

“I am so happy to see you Yote,” I say as I throw my arms around his neck to give him a big hug.

I hold him tight as all my worries and frustration seem to carelessly drift away.

“Alright, Cowgirl. I have decided you are going to get a personal chef and a house maid to watch over you. The chef will make you three meals a day and the maid will make sure you are in good health, get enough sleep and can keep an eye on you,” Yote states.

While Yote was speaking, I immediately felt defensive and felt like I was being treated like a child. I then reminded myself, that I needed to keep an open mind, so I agreed.

“Great,” Yote says, “Jimmy will post an ad and call around tomorrow. We'll schedule some interviews for you to meet your new hired help.”

“Great idea Yote, thank you. And thank you Jimmy for everything as well,” I respond.

I had more shit to worry about than to bother my mind with hiring or arguing about hiring a personal chef and maid. Besides, there would be so many benefits of having them around.


When we arrived to the ranch it was early into the next day and I immediately grab Cookie and go to bed.

-------------------------------------------------------------
I wake up sweaty and in chills. The whole ranch is still, peaceful and quiet. I crawl out of the bed as Cookie follows me to the balcony. I sit down in a chair and stare out over my ranch. The sun feels good beating down on my skin as I close my eyes and begin to drift away.

Cookie is barking as she wakes me from my nap.

“What’s wrong Cookie?” I ask.

I see nothing. She continues to bark as I sit up and check my surroundings. I see nothing.

Suddenly, chills start at the top of my neck and crawl through the tips of my toes. I feel something I’ve never felt before. I look out in the flat as the sun blinds me. I see someone. It’s running towards me.

It’s getting closer. I begin to notice a Native American warrior – he’s running. He is wearing white dancing regalia.  I can clearly depict his Mukluks that are tan with white fur decorating the outsides. He has colored feathers and leggings on, but no shirt. Long black hair hits the middle of his back as I start to see his face. I can only make out that he is in distress and is running from something.

Before he gets too close, he disappears. I frantically jump out of my chair and run down to the barn to find Jimmy or Yote.

“Jimmy! Where’s Yote?”

“Hey, Good morning. What’s wrong? I told Yote to go get some rest, I am not sure where he went.”

“Jimmy, I saw something. I am not delusional and I am not crazy. I felt it. It was a spirit. An Indian warrior in dancing regalia. He was running from something. Then, disappeared. My body feels weak and I feel suddenly exhausted. I felt it Jimmy, I felt something I haven’t experienced before,” I say as I put my hand to my head and try to think hard.


“We need to wait for Yote to get here. Go inside and get something to eat,” Jimmy says as I turn around to walk back to the house.

I snap back around as I remember something, “Jimmy, where did you burry those carcasses?” I ask in a panic.

“Oh, just over near the Morton Flat.”

“No, but where near the Morton Flat?”

"I don’t know exactly but I can show you. Why?” Jimmy asks.

“I am fearful you dug up Indian burial ground.”

“No, Grandpa buried lots of horses there,” Jimmy replied.

“Yes, but Grandpa did it.”

Jimmy’s eyes widened, “Oh my gosh, you’re right. You need to call Yote!”

I turn and run to the house to grab my pistol. I fire five shots in the air. Five shots means its urgent!

To be continued.